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Sometimes Questions are More Important Than Answers

Introspective questions point to truths and conclusions that may be obvious to others, but remain difficult to see for ourselves.

The chances are good that you already know what you need to do, but the lens you look through is foggy and needs to be wiped clean. Take the intuitive, instinctual approach. Rather than grumble and complain about what you have not, or why certain things in your life, “always seem to happen to poor ol’ me”, go inward and ask yourself the following questions…

Proceed with caution — personal epiphanies await

  1. What could realistically be the cause of my struggle?
  2. What do I know, but refuse to acknowledge or admit?
  3. What am I not doing, but that those who are happy and successful are?
  4. What am I resisting?
  5. What am I ignoring or putting off?
  6. What could I be putting more effort, energy and focus into?
  7. How might I be needlessly wasting money?
  8. Where do I spend my time?
  9. What am I doing with the spare hours in my day?
  10. Are my days efficient and productive?
  11. How do I react to events outside of my control?
  12. Do I listen and think before I speak or reply?
  13. Am I giving my body its necessary physical requirements? Proper nutrition, energy and exercise?
  14. What do I consume too much of? What might I rely on far too much?
  15. Do I give myself time to sit in silence and reflect?
  16. How do I fill my mind? With books, wisdom and education? Or gossip, drama and distractions?
  17. Am I guilty of constantly comparing myself to others?
  18. Do I believe that everyone walks a different path, at different times, and that no two journeys will be exactly the same?
  19. Do I believe I have something special and amazing to offer and give to the world?
  20. Do I continue to expand my awareness and learn new things?
  21. Am I more focussed on a steadfast goal, rather than just doing and enjoying work I love?
  22. Do I have a creative outlet? How do I express myself?
  23. Do I tend to focus more on the problems themselves, or on finding the solutions?
  24. What is the energy I bring to things, to projects and to others? What is my vibe?
  25. Am I open, or closed? Do I smile more than I frown?
  26. Am I more apt to love, or to hate?
  27. What is my life story that I continue to tell and identify with? How is that serving me? Does it drag me down, or build me up?
  28. Do I firmly believe my past limits what I can achieve today? Or am I holding on to an excuse, something to hold accountable for my struggles and suffering, something to point to other than myself? Who do I blame?
  29. Do I believe a person’s past problems can be overcome?
  30. Do I believe that all of these are just behaviours, and that everyone single one is able to be changed?

Now don’t be too hard on yourself. We’re all imperfect, and every single one of us is a lifelong work-in-progress. This internal inquiry isn’t intended to place blame, but is meant to pull back the dark curtains to reveal your true nature, and to discover your infinite potential.

Everyday is a new beginning. Are you ready to initiate change? Begin today.

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Brian Thompson

Brian Thompson is Creator of Zen Thinking and author of the upcoming book, Sparks to Awaken. Writer, speaker, and teacher of Non-Duality who shares original essays, poems, podcasts, and videos on spiritual self-realization.

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2 Comments on "Sometimes Questions are More Important Than Answers"

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Akiroq Brost
Member

These are all great questions we can ask ourselves to get ourselves back on track! Thanks Brian. <3

Shivali Singla
Member

I believe a person can overcome her/his past problems with a better understanding and execution in present.