McGill Media — Home Discussion Hub BigWhistle.org Drug Crisis Opioid drug overdoses killed more Americans last year than the Vietnam War

last updated by  Lawney 3 months ago
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  • #73575
    Bryant McGill
    Keymaster

    Jenni and I watched Heroin(e) on Netflix recently. A truly shocking eye-opener about the opioid crisis in America, and the devastation that comes with it, to people and the cities that do not have the resources to manage the problem. I highly recommend watching this film.

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    IN THE NEWS

    CBS: Drug overdoses killed more Americans last year than the Vietnam War
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/opioids-drug-overdose-killed-more-americans-last-year-than-the-vietnam-war/

    Washington Post: Fueled by drug crisis, U.S. life expectancy declines for a second straight year
    http://wapo.st/2BpGCYG

    Forbes: America’s Opioid Crisis: A Nation Hooked
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilhowe/2017/11/30/americas-opioid-crisis-a-nation-hooked/

    CNN: Opioid Crisis Fast Facts
    https://www.cnn.com/2017/09/18/health/opioid-crisis-fast-facts/index.html

    Newsweek: TRUMP SAID THE DRUG EPIDEMIC IS UNLIKE ANYTHING IN AMERICAN HISTORY. IS HE RIGHT?
    http://www.newsweek.com/donald-trump-drug-opioid-crisis-771039

    USA Today: With 175 Americans dying a day, what are the solutions to the opioid epidemic?
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/01/29/175-americans-dying-day-what-solutions-opioid-epidemic/1074336001/

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    Heroin(e)
    Once a bustling industrial town, Huntington, West Virginia has become the epicenter of America’s modern opioid epidemic, with an overdose rate 10 times the national average. This flood of heroin now threatens this Appalachian city with a cycle of generational addiction, lawlessness, and poverty. But within this distressed landscape, Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Elaine McMillion Sheldon (Hollow) shows a different side of the fight against drugs — one of hope. Sheldon highlights three women working to change the town’s narrative and break the devastating cycle of drug abuse one person at a time. Fire Chief Jan Rader spends the majority of her days reviving those who have overdosed; Judge Patricia Keller presides over drug court, handing down empathy along with orders; and Necia Freeman of Brown Bag Ministry feeds meals to the women selling their bodies for drugs. As America’s opioid crisis threatens to tear communities apart, the Netflix original short documentary Heroin(e) shows how the chain of compassion holds one town together.

    https://www.netflix.com/title/80192445

  • #73624
    Jackie Wilushewski
    Participant

    I have a close friend and know many others who experienced severe life threatening situations due to this terrible crisis. This is saddening. There been many new Clinics,, Support Groups and more services being offered for drug addiction and related dilemmas here.

  • #81348
    Mayuri Rana
    Participant

    It’s really sad to see how drug has overpowering effect on a person in such a negative way. I hope the government come up with a “dry area” kind of concept where anything self-destructive is completely banned. I grew up in a dry state so I wasn’t surrounded by alcoholism or drugs.

  • #81382
    Lawney
    Participant

    Drug abuse is such a massive problem. it is a type of war for sure. It is killing so many.

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